Monthly Archives: July 2011

Evolution 1, Supercomputers 0 – Farnam Street

In a new study, researchers report that bumblebees were able to figure out the most efficient routes among several computer-controlled “flowers,” quickly solving a complex problem that even stumps supercomputers. We already know bees are pretty good at facial recognition, … Continue reading

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Biased but Brilliant, Science Embraces Pigheadedness – NYTimes.com

“A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die, and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it.” Scientific truth, according to this … Continue reading

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Know Thyself: Easier Said Than Done – Farnam Street

Despite what we believe about our powers of introspection, the reality is that we know awfully little about what our conscious experience amounts to. When people today are asked whether they regularly dream in color, most say they do. But … Continue reading

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The Secret Ingredient In Your Orange Juice | Food Renegade

Haven’t you ever wondered why every glass of Tropicana Pure Premium orange juice tastes the same, no matter where in the world you buy it or what time of year you’re drinking it in? Or maybe your brand of choice … Continue reading

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China as an Innovation Center? Not So Fast-华尔街日报

China is indeed mounting considerable efforts on the innovation front. However, many of the pundits seem to confuse inputs with outputs The ‘inputs’ for innovation are impressive. China’s R&D expenditure increased to 1.5% of GDP in 2010 from 1.1% in … Continue reading

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Telecommute Nation: If Half of Us Could Work Remotely, Why Don’t We? – Derek Thompson – Business – The Atlantic

In a nutshell: Half of us could work remotely if we wanted. Far less do. Why? The answer might have more to do with psychology than economics. Even if we’re technically more productive at home, we feel more conspicuously productive … Continue reading

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Minority rules: Scientists discover tipping point for the spread of ideas

Scientists at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have found that when just 10 percent of the population holds an unshakable belief, their belief will always be adopted by the majority of the society. The scientists, who are members of the Social Cognitive Networks … Continue reading

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