Study Hacks » Blog Archive » Don’t Quit Your Day Job, Transform It: Why Following Your Passion is the Wrong Way to Find Occupational Happiness

He moved to Colorado with his finacee, where they bought a house and a puppy. He makes less but this is balanced by lower living expenses. He finds the work challenging and feels recognized for his abilities: two crucial traits in loving what you do. Of equal importance, the pace of work is more reasonable than at his old office, giving him more time to spend at home, visiting family (who live nearby), and indulging his love of outdoor sports (a required activity in Colorado).

Ben argues that a calling — which he defines, quoting Michael Lewis, as “an activity you find so compelling that you wind up organizing your entire self around it” — is usually pursued at the expense of the other important areas of your life.

As I’ve argued before, thirty years of research has identified the following three traits to be crucial if you want a rich life:

Autonomy — control over how you fill your time.

Competence –  mastering unambiguously useful things.

Relatedness — feeling of connection to others.

The direct route to achieving autonomy, competence, and relatedness is to master something rare and valuable. The argument is economic: if you want your career to accommodate these desirable traits, you need to offer something valuable in return — the market couldn’t care less about your soul’s ache for fulfillment.

Passion alone is not enough. You have to experiment with your passion and practice to get more competent at your passion.

via Study Hacks » Blog Archive » Don’t Quit Your Day Job, Transform It: Why Following Your Passion is the Wrong Way to Find Occupational Happiness.

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