Why we shun creativity in the work place – The Globe and Mail

Creativity, no matter how much we say we like it, frequently elicits what my grandmother used to warn about: “Too smart is half stupid”

Now, new research, soon to appear in Psychological Science, titled “The Bias Against Creativity: Why People Desire But Reject Creative Ideas,” empirically documents how our resistance to uncertainty makes the “old ways” far stickier than they should be given the practical benefits of creative, new solutions. Once again, the biases built into our minds leave us simultaneously moving in opposite directions; we like creativity but avoid creative ideas because creative ideas are too, in a word, creative.

“Our results show that regardless of how open minded people are, when they feel motivated to reduce uncertainty either because they have an immediate goal of reducing uncertainty, or feel uncertain generally, this may bring negative associations with creativity to mind, which result in lower evaluations of a creative idea. Our findings imply a deep irony. Prior research shows that uncertainty spurs the search for and generation of creative ideas … yet our findings reveal that uncertainty also makes us less able to recognize creativity, perhaps when we need it most,” write the authors, Jennifer S. Mueller, Shimul Melwani, and Jack A. Goncalo.

via Why we shun creativity in the work place – The Globe and Mail.

Humans are inherently dubious, bipolar or hypocritical. They want to have cake and eat it too. Yes they do have to trade off but sometimes being hypocritical is the outcome of this trade off!

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