In China, what you eat tells who you are – latimes.com

Until May, a sign inside the gate identified the property as the Beijing Customs Administration Vegetable Base and Country Club. The placard was removed after a Chinese reporter sneaked inside and published a story about the farm producing organic food so clean the cucumbers could be eaten directly from the vine.

Elsewhere in the world, this might be something to boast about. Not in China. Organic gardening here is a hush-hush affair in which the cleanest, safest products are largely channeled to the rich and politically connected.

Many of the nation’s best food companies don’t promote or advertise. They don’t want the public to know that their limited supply is sent to Communist Party officials, dining halls reserved for top athletes, foreign diplomats, and others in the elite classes. The general public, meanwhile, dines on foods that are increasingly tainted or less than healthful — meats laced with steroids, fish from ponds spiked with hormones to increase growth, milk containing dangerous additives such as melamine, which allows watered-down milk to pass protein-content tests.

In China, the tegong, or special supply, is a holdover from the early years of Communist rule, when danwei, work units of state-owned enterprises, raised their own food and allocated it based on rank. “The leaders wanted to make sure they had enough to eat and that nobody poisoned their food,” said Gao.

via In China, what you eat tells who you are – latimes.com.

A good case where loss aversion is not particularly working, given the obvious damage to health. Part of the reason is little alternative option for common Chinese. A complete model should take the availability of alternatives into account. Also health damage is not like monetary loss: the latter is more salient, more uniform, more liquid and undeniable, while the former is less straightforward, allowing rooms for dissonance reduction and alleviation. 

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