The Happiness Project: What You Do Every Day Matters More Than What You Do Once In a While.

One of my Secrets of Adulthood is: What you do every day matters more than what you do once in a while.

In his fascinating book, House Lust, Daniel McGinn notes that market researchers use the term maximum-use imperative to describe the fact that people will often buy something to accommodate a use that they need only rarely. So, for example, you might look for a house, or a dining room table, that’s big enough to seat your entire family when it’s your turn to host Christmas dinner, even though you have a family of four that’s dwarfed by that size.

Along the same lines, I’ve noticed that when making decisions, I tend to give too much thought to what I do once in a while and not enough weight to what I do every day. For example, I wear running shoes 29 days out of 30 days a month, yet I have three pairs of black flats and only one pair of running shoes.

via The Happiness Project: What You Do Every Day Matters More Than What You Do Once In a While..

This happens to many and is real! In planning we tend to prepare for the worst and most but that’s a source of low efficiency and waste.

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