Do Me A Favor So You’ll Like Me: The Reverse Psychology of Likeability – Forbes

If you do a person a favor, you would expect that person to like you more.  However, the research shows something different. If you do someone a favor, you tend to like that person more as a result. The reason is that we justify our actions to ourselves by assuming that we did the person a favor because we like them.

This phenomenon is dubbed the Ben Franklin effect, who quipped:

He that has once done you a kindness will be more ready to do you another than he whom you yourself have obliged.

via Do Me A Favor So You’ll Like Me: The Reverse Psychology of Likeability – Forbes.

It is easy to understand this Franklin effect: one justify prior interaction with a reason and then take that as a sign for the future.

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