Wall Street Can’t Handle the Truth-华尔街日报

Over the past 12 years, longtime banking analyst Mike Mayo has issued numerous calls to sell bank stocks, a rarity in a system where nearly all stocks are rated buy or hold. His negative ratings have frequently gotten him in trouble with banks, clients and his own bosses, who didn’t want to alienate those companies. In this excerpt from his new book, ‘Exile on Wall Street,’ Mr. Mayo gives an inside view of the fights, the scolding and the threatening phone calls he received as a result of yelling ‘sell’─and offers a proposal to fix the banking sector.

The proportion of sell ratings on Wall Street remains under 5%, even today, despite the fact that any first-year MBA student can tell you that 95% of the stocks cannot be winners.

In decades past, the ratio of buy ratings to sell ratings had not been this lopsided, and in theory it should be roughly 50-50. That seems right, doesn’t it? Some stocks go up, some go down, because of the overall market direction or competitive threats or issues specific to each company. In the late 1990s, though, the ratio was 100 buys or more for every sell. Merrill Lynch had buy ratings on 940 stocks and sell ratings on just 7. Salomon Smith Barney: 856 buy ratings, 4 sells. Morgan Stanley Dean Witter: 670 buys and exactly 0 sells.

Analysts almost never said to sell specific companies, because that would alienate those firms, which then might move business for bond offerings, equity deals, acquisitions, buybacks or other activity away from the analyst’s brokerage firm. Say the word ‘sell’ enough times, and you win a long, awkward elevator ride out of the building with your soon-to-be-former boss. And here I was, ready to go negative on the entire banking sector.

via Wall Street Can’t Handle the Truth-华尔街日报.

This is the best example for CICE in my theory. It is not on the book or stated openly but exist for real 

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