Can Mountain Dew Really Dissolve a Mouse Carcass?: Scientific American

Two takeaways: you need to be careful not to expose a larger, more severe problem when defending for a relatively small issue; two, this kind of publicity crisis should be exercised by firms routinely. Always ask yourself: what if this happens to me?

An attempt to win a small court battle this week has put Mountain Dew in peril of losing a much larger war. PepsiCo, the soft drink’s parent company, defended itself against a man who claimed he found a dead mouse in a can of the citrus soda. Experts called in by PepsiCo’s lawyers offered a stomach-churning explanation for why it couldn’t be true: the Mountain Dew would have dissolved the mouse, turning it into a “jelly-like substance,” had it been in the can of fluid from the time of its bottling until the day the plaintiff opened it, 15 months later.

There is plenty of evidence to suggest that the neon green soda can eat away teeth and bones in a matter of months, and would likely do quite a number on a rodent.

Consequently, these drinks have a low pH value around 3 (very acidic). Mountain Dew and Sprite erode tooth enamel around six times faster than colas.

When Fraunhofer’s team soaked human molars in Mountain Dew for two weeks (a period of time comparable to approximately 13 years of normal beverage exposure, the researchers calculated) the molars’ enamel lost more than 6 percent of its volume.

via Can Mountain Dew Really Dissolve a Mouse Carcass?: Scientific American.

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