‘Highly Tweeted Articles Were 11 Times More Likely to Be Highly Cited’ – Alexis Madrigal – Technology – The Atlantic

Yes, as the guy is saying: virtual world has connections to real world, especially for intelligent pieces. The good thing about social media network is that they speed up the process from journals to citations.

We have a new study for those who argue that social media, whatever its virtues may be, doesn’t correlate very well with the real world. It comes from the Journal of Medical Internet Research and is based on a three-year study of that journal’s articles’ relative success in the Twitter and academic worlds.

The bottom line is simple: articles that many people tweeted about were 11 times more likely to be highly cited than those who few people tweeted about. Its implications are even more interesting. It generally takes months and years for papers to be cited by other scientific publications. Thus, on the day an article comes out, it would seem to be difficult to tell whether it will have a real impact on a given field. However, because the majority of tweets about journal articles occur within the first two days of publication, we now have an early signal about which research is likely to be significant.

via ‘Highly Tweeted Articles Were 11 Times More Likely to Be Highly Cited’ – Alexis Madrigal – Technology – The Atlantic.

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