Impact of Group Settings and Gender on Meals Purchased by College Students – ALLEN-O’DONNELL – 2011 – Journal of Applied Social Psychology – Wiley Online Library

It has been repeatedly found before that women tend to be more sensitive to what others reaction may be more than men. This makes ladies more empathy than men but weakens their preferences.

This study examines the impact of social context and perception of weight on calories purchased by college students in a natural setting. Not only did women in mixed-gender groups purchase fewer calories than did women in same-gender groups, but significant interaction effects exist among the gender composition of groups, perception of being overweight, and gender of respondents. Men modified calories purchased across mixed-gender and same-gender groups, purchasing more when in mixed-gender groups. The study helps address theoretical and methodological gaps in prior research and frames the findings in terms of variation of gender salience across social relational contexts.

Female college students in a U.S. study bought an average of833 calories per meal when they ate with other women but just721 when they were with men, whereas men bought 952calories when they were with other males but 1,162 when they were with females, says a team led by Molly Allen-O’Donnell of Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Meal size seems to be a tool for influencing others, the researchers say: In mixed company, women show their femininity by purchasing less, while men assert their masculinity by buying more.

via Impact of Group Settings and Gender on Meals Purchased by College Students – ALLEN-O’DONNELL – 2011 – Journal of Applied Social Psychology – Wiley Online Library.

This entry was posted in Human Economics. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s